La Tecnologia esta dominada por dos tipos de personas:
aquellos que entienden lo que no administran,
y aquellos que administran lo que no entienden.
- Anonimo

Donald Knuth... extractos de una entrevista

Etiquetas: , ,

La gente de informIT publico hace unos pocos dias una entrevista con Donald Knuth (uno de los padres del open-source, destacado profesor en Stanford, diseñador del MMIX, creador de TeX y autor del famoso compendio The Art Of Computing Programming), y esta vez comparto lo que a mi parecer son sus mas candentes comentarios en el area de computer science.

(foto original tomada de la web page de Stanford Magazine)
  • The success of open source code is perhaps the only thing in the computer field that hasn’t surprised me during the past several decades. But it still hasn’t reached its full potential; I believe that open-source programs will begin to be completely dominant as the economy moves more and more from products towards services, and as more and more volunteers arise to improve the code.
  • To me, it looks more or less like the hardware designers have run out of ideas, and that they’re trying to pass the blame for the future demise of Moore’s Law to the software writers by giving us machines that work faster only on a few key benchmarks!
  • How many programmers do you know who are enthusiastic about these promised machines of the future? I hear almost nothing but grief from software people. I know that important applications for parallelism exist—rendering graphics, breaking codes, scanning images, simulating physical and biological processes, etc. But all these applications require dedicated code and special-purpose techniques.
  • The machine I use today has dual processors. I get to use them both only when I’m running two independent jobs at the same time; that’s nice, but it happens only a few minutes every week. So why should I be so happy about the future that hardware vendors promise? They think a magic bullet will come along to make multicores speed up my kind of work; I think it’s a bubble dream. From the opposite point of view, I do grant that web browsing probably will get better with multicores. I’ve been talking about my technical work, however, not recreation.
  • In my experience, software created with literate programming has turned out to be significantly better than software developed in more traditional ways. Yet ordinary software is usually okay; hence, the traditional methods stay with us. Since they’re understood by a vast community of programmers, most people have no big incentive to change, just as I’m not motivated to learn Esperanto even though it might be preferable to English and German and French and Russian (if everybody switched).
  • If people do discover nice ways to use the newfangled multithreaded machines, I would expect the discovery to come from people who routinely use literate programming. Literate programming is what you need to rise above the ordinary level of achievement. But I don’t believe in forcing ideas on anybody. If literate programming isn’t your style, please forget it and do what you like. If nobody likes it but me, let it die.
  • I currently use Ubuntu Linux, on a standalone laptop—it has no Internet connection. I occasionally carry flash memory drives between this machine and the Macs that I use for network surfing and graphics; but I trust my family jewels only to Linux. Incidentally, with Linux I much prefer the keyboard focus that I can get with classic FVWM to the GNOME and KDE environments that other people seem to like better. To each his own.
  • I also must confess to a strong bias against the fashion for reusable code. To me, "re-editable code" is much, much better than an untouchable black box or toolkit. I could go on and on about this. If you’re totally convinced that reusable code is wonderful, I probably won’t be able to sway you anyway, but you’ll never convince me that reusable code isn’t mostly a menace.
Ahi lo tienen y me alegra saber que no somos pocos los que predicamos el literate programming, extreme programming y el reuso/reedicion de codigo existente.

Alguien aun usa el FVWM? o ya todos somos adictos al GNOME o KDE? jeje!!

Gracias por leer.

0 comentarios:

Publicar un comentario